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Articles Posted in Landlord-Tenant Disputes

Have you ever heard of this? If you are familiar with leases in the New York City area, you probably have.  But if you are not, you might be a bit surprised by it.  Like many legal issues that begin in either New York or California, the Good Guy Guaranty is now spreading beyond those borders, and if you are in the business of leasing space, you should become aware of it.

In essence, a Good Guy Guaranty is a pre-negotiated kick-out with the financial backing of a credit-worthy guarantor.  The guaranty is in place while the tenant is in possession, but if the tenant gives the landlord sufficient notice that it intends to vacate the premises and subsequently leaves the premises in good condition and as otherwise required by the lease, the tenant and the guarantor are both released.

shops-225x300The landlord benefits from it because it has a guarantor that backs the tenant and a tenant that surrenders possession when they vacate, thereby avoiding the need for the landlord to undertake eviction or abandonment litigation. The tenant benefits in that if it gives the landlord advance notice of its intent to vacate (usually anywhere from six to nine months) and is otherwise in compliance with the lease, it can close, be relieved of future liability and not be sued for damages.  And, the guarantor benefits in that if they make sure the tenant complies with the lease, the guarantor is never called upon to pay.

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ETroesche-srhl-law-200x300ORivera2014By:  Oscar R. Rivera and Emily Troesch

For commercial real estate landlords, guaranty agreements requiring the principal owners of small businesses to personally guaranty the obligations of the corporate tenant are standard operating procedure. In addition, commercial landlords oftentimes also require the corporate guaranty of a parent or other affiliated company, if the creditworthiness of a corporate tenant or franchisee is questionable.  One question that is often posed is whether waivers of defenses by guarantors in such guaranty agreements are enforceable?  Fortunately, for property owners in Florida, if the waivers are properly drafted, the answer is yes.

The waiver of defenses paragraph helps property owners avoid costly and disruptive litigation if legal action becomes necessary to enforce a guaranty.  Guaranty agreements containing language that clearly and unambiguously waives defenses to the enforcement of the guaranty have been strictly construed and enforced by Florida courts.

A typical waiver provision reads as follows:

“Guarantor hereby expressly waives (a) notice of acceptance of this Guaranty; (b) presentment and demand for payment of any of the Liabilities of Tenant; (c) protest and notice of nonpayment, nonperformance, nonobservance or default to Guarantor or to any other party with respect to any of the Liabilities of Tenant; (d) all other notices to which Guarantor might otherwise be entitled; (e) any demand for payment under this Guaranty; and (f) any and all defenses relating to Landlord’s failure to perfect a security interest in Tenant’s property and/or seize or attach any other collateral.”

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A ruling filed on July 22 by the Second District Court of Appeal overturned the circuit court’s summary judgment in favor of a landlord for the eviction of its tenant that operated a restaurant and a separate nightclub from its two spaces at the property. The ruling adds clarity to the burdens that must be met for summary judgments granting commercial evictions.