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Articles Posted in Real Estate Law

ORivera2014For the third time this week, an article by one of our firm’s attorneys was featured as the “Board of Contributors” guest commentary column in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s exclusive business daily and official court newspaper.  Today’s article, which is authored by shareholder Oscar R. Rivera, is titled “Appellate Court Strictly Construes FAR-BAR ‘As Is’ Residential Sales Contract.”  It focuses on a recent appellate ruling that affirmed an $850,000 award for legal fees and costs in a dispute over a $2.85 million residential sale gone awry.  Oscar’s article reads:

The ruling by the Third District Court of Appeal in Diaz v. Kosch, is certainly drawing quite a bit of industry attention, and there are a number of important takeaways from it for buyers, sellers and the professionals who work on their behalf.

The case stems from the sale of a Coral Gables home in 2012 for $2.85 million. After the sales contract was executed and the initial $50,000 deposit had been made, the buyers, who are identified in the ruling as both being “attorneys with substantial experience with real estate transactions and title matters,” notified their broker on the penultimate day of the 10-day inspection period about potential permitting issues with the property. On the following day, the buyers sent an email to the sellers accusing them of “active misrepresentations” and threatening “legal fees and litigation.”

dbr-logo-1-300x57Nonetheless, on the same date, the buyers made the second deposit of $235,000, stating it was “with full rights reserved.” A week and a half later, they emailed a notice of termination to the sellers, who were amendable to it and responded by imposing no conditions on the return of the buyers’ full deposit. However, apparently due to demands for a release from legal liability by the buyers’ own broker (who also served as the escrow agent), the deposit was not returned by the escrow agent.

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For many businesses, finding the right location at the best possible lease rates and with the best terms is among their most pressing and impactful challenges for the future of the enterprise.  The business location and the costs of leasing the space can often be among the foremost determining factors in a company’s long-term success.  As such, the negotiation of the terms of commercial leases is typically of the upmost importance.

For tenants, the best way to start is for the principals to gather information on the neighborhoods and locations that hold the most promise.  In addition to turning to highly experienced and qualified commercial real estate brokers for guidance, they should do their own research and become educated.  Prior to any meetings with prospective landlords and their representatives, they should take the time to conduct a thorough SWOT analysis to identify the strengths,cre2-300x237 weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to every prospective property.

This exercise, which is also beneficial for landlords to employ when assessing their lease offers, will help to enable businesses and organizations to develop a list of the priorities that they seek for each and every location.  Both landlords and tenants can use this form of analysis to create an agenda for their discussions.

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ORivera-DBR-profile-11-17The firm’s Oscar R. Rivera was the subject of a profile article in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s exclusive business daily and official court newspaper.  The article, which is titled “Real Estate Attorney Oscar Rivera Traces Career Roots to Shredding Carbon Paper,” chronicles Oscar’s career in the law, which began when he was still in high school in the 1970s.  It reads:

Oscar R. Rivera’s first job at a law firm required him to go through the office trash cans to find and shred the discarded carbon sheets used to make copies of legal documents.

That was in the 1970s, and Rivera was in high school and working at a Miami management-side labor law firm. His shredding was meant to prevent a pro-union law firm from dumpster-diving to read the flimsy purple sheets to gain insight into its opponent’s strategy, Rivera said.

“If you looked at the carbon paper against the light, you could read the letter,” he said.

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Co-tenancy clauses allow key retail tenants a reduction in rent if other key tenants or a certain number of other tenants leave a center.  While not common for smaller retailers, they are more common for anchor tenants.  Anchor stores and other key tenants draw significant traffic to centers, and they are often among the primary reasons other tenants select their location.

With all of the challenges plaguing some retailers, including store closings by such major national retailers as Macy’s, K-Mart, Sears, Sports Authority, Kohls and Toys-R-Us, landlords could face significant losses when their remaining tenants demand rent reductions based on their co-tenancy clauses.

leasesign2Typical ongoing co-tenancy clause requirements state that if one or more specified co-tenants are no longer open and operating, the landlord has a set timeframe (typically 90 to 180 days) during which it must secure one or more comparable replacement tenants.  If it fails to do so, the remaining tenants with ongoing co-tenancy clauses will pay alternate rent amounts until replacement tenants are operating.  Ultimately, if no replacements are found for periods typically ranging from 12 to 18 months, the remaining tenants may have the right to terminate their leases.

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Oscar R. Rivera

Oscar R. Rivera

The Daily Business Review, South Florida’s only business daily and official court newspaper, chronicles in its weekly “Dealmakers” column the work of South Florida professionals in putting together and finalizing many of the area’s largest real estate transactions.  The firm’s Oscar R. Rivera was the featured Dealmakers in this week’s column, which appeared in today’s edition of the newspaper.  The article, which is titled “Attorneys for Buyer Closed $74M Office Deal with Bonus Acre to Develop,” focused on his work in representing the buyer of the Doral Costa office park in a $73.75 million acquisition.  It reads:

The reasons an affiliate of Triarch Investment Group wanted to acquire the 17.8-acre Doral Costa Office Park are clear.

The three Class A office buildings are 96 percent leased in a strong submarket. Tenants include Allstate Corp., HSBC Bank and Samsung. The property has nearly an acre of developable land.

“The Doral area is a very attractive area. Developable land in the heart of an office complex was very attractive to this buyer group,” said Oscar Rivera, a shareholder with Siegfried Rivera, who represented buyer Doral Costa Capital LLC.

“These buildings are anchored by a significant and well-established group of tenants,” Rivera added. “It was a very solid investment for the buyer group.”

But completing the $73.75 million transaction with the seller, an affiliate of Boston-based TA Associates Realty, required fast work.

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I am proud to be participating in the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) University of Shopping Centers event, which will be taking place on the campus of the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania on March 7-9, 2016.  This three-day educational program will enable attendees to gain a higher level of knowledge of the retail real estate industry by learning directly from experienced professionals.

orivera1The firm’s Oscar R. Rivera was quoted extensively in an article that appeared in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s only business daily and official court newspaper.  The article, which was titled “Judge Urges Fairness in Foreclosure Actions,” focused on the concurring opinion written by Judge Chris Altenbernd of the Second District Court of Appeal in the court’s ruling filed on Jan. 13 in the case of Bonafide Properties v. Wells Fargo.  The article reads:

OscarRivera2014.jpgThe firm’s Oscar R. Rivera wrote an article that appeared today in the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s exclusive business daily and official court newspaper. The article, which was titled “Best Practices for Buyouts of Unit Owners at Older Condos,” discusses recent changes in the Florida condominium termination law and important considerations for developers in these property acquisitions. Oscar’s article reads:

A recent ruling involving a lawsuit by Wells Fargo Bank against the former ownership group of the Palm Beach Mall is emblematic of the post-recession efforts of lenders to recover damages from their commercial real estate borrowers. The convoluted case included several counts alleging various types of damages against the former owners and operators of the mall, but the lender lost on all of its counts and motions in both the trial and appellate courts. While it ultimately may not have impacted the outcome, a couple of seemingly minor mistakes and omissions in the guaranty and loan agreements created significant difficulties for the lender that it was unable to overcome in court.

OscarRivera2014.jpgThe firm’s Oscar R. Rivera contributed a guest column that appeared in today’s edition of the Daily Business Review, South Florida’s only business daily and official court newspaper, about the recent decision by the First District Court of Appeal in the case of Thomas I. Bowman v. Jon Michael Barker et al. His article reads: